?

Log in

Title: even a fist was once an open palm and fingers
Author: ellenm. aka quasiradiant
Fandom: dcu. specially birds of prey, but drawing heavily from manhunter and huntress: year one.
Pairings: kate spencer (manhunter) / helena bertinelli (huntress)

see part 1 for extended headers.

Part 4Collapse )
Title: even a fist was once an open palm and fingers
Author: ellenm. aka quasiradiant
Fandom: dcu. specially birds of prey, but drawing heavily from manhunter and huntress: year one.
Pairings: kate spencer (manhunter) / helena bertinelli (huntress)

see part 1 for extended headers.

Part 3Collapse )
Title: even a fist was once an open palm and fingers
Author: ellenm. aka quasiradiant
Fandom: dcu. specially birds of prey, but drawing heavily from manhunter and huntress: year one.
Pairings: kate spencer (manhunter) / helena bertinelli (huntress)

see part 1 for extended headers.

Part 2Collapse )
Title: even a fist was once an open palm and fingers
Author: ellenm. aka quasiradiant
Fandom: dcu. specially birds of prey, but drawing heavily from manhunter and huntress: year one.
Pairings: kate spencer (manhunter) / helena bertinelli (huntress)
Characters: from the dcu, includes dylan, misfit, and maybe oracle, if you squint.
Rating: nc-17.
Warnings: includes graphic descriptions of murder, bondage, and nonsexual violence.
Betas: cleo2584 and thenewhope
Summary: Kate Spencer, better known to Los Angeles' criminal element as Manhunter, has hung up the cape in favor of a normal life, which certainly doesn't involve any kind of relationship with Helena Bertinelli, Kate's best friend and co-vigilante, Huntress.  But news of a serial killer hunting lawyers in Miami draws Kate to the East Coast and Manhunter out of hiding.  With Kate and Helena on the case, it doesn't seem like anything can go wrong.  Until it really, really does.
Artwork:

Author's Notes: set a few months after the final issue of birds of prey and ignoring everything that's occurred since, including the events in the Oracle mini.  title from Yehuda Amichai's poem "Anniversaries of War."

Part 1Collapse )

NEED HELP PLZ

okay cats and kittens! i am BOUND AND DETERMINED to have my thelittlebang story completed by august 9th (the do or die date).

here's the situation. i have ~25,500 words right now. i predict the addition of ~7-10,000 words over the next couple of days. i am LACKING IN BETAS. so here's the deal. i am looking for one to two betas, who can turn around 30-40,000 words in, uh, about a day?

i know that's a lot to ask. but i will make it worth your while or something! after i finish this, i will write you a story from the prompt of your choosing! or i will send you a present! or buy you coffee if you are in my area!

the story is dc comics universe, basically a birds of prey story, but post the last issue of birds of prey. it is a kate spencer (manhunter) / helena bertinelli (huntress) story and it draws heavily from the manhunter and huntress: year one titles. however, the plot is totally random and does not require a huge amount of backstory.

any desire? let me know.

Writer's Block: Duos

Sam and Diane, Ross and Rachel, Chuck and Blair—who is your favorite TV couple?


i reject this hetero-fucking-sexist question.

drive by!

this is a fascinating and wonderful idea. you should spread the link, i think. (not work safe, btw.)

also, the jason nevins remix of taylor swift's love story is AWFUL. makes me so sad.

also, hey everybody!

Writer's Block: You Don't Know Me

Our friends don't always know us as well as they think, particularly when it comes to likes and dislikes. Which popular book, movie, band, food, TV show, etc. would your friends be surprised to hear that you don't like?


occasionally, i find myself compelled to answer these stupid questions.

book: lord of the rings. for christ's sake, i've tried to start that damn series approximately 49,326 (p < 0.05) but i find them just horrible. also, the first movie, the only one i saw, was awful. just awful.

movie: well, aside from lord of the rings? mostly people just assume i've seen tons of movies that i never have. because i am an uncultured fuck, apparently? no, but it's true. i AM an uncultured fuck. it suits me fine. i think some people would be surprised that i didn't like high school musical 3, considering how devoted i was to the first 2. also, kevin smith movies. god, i hate kevin smith movies.

food: sushi! most people know this, but they continue to give me crap about it. i don't mind the fish, really, but i'd rather a nice tuna tartar if i'm forced to eat it raw. there's a reason we discovered fire, people.

tv show: well, huh. i like most tv shows. i feel entirely uncompelled to watch american idol, and i think the very idea of dancing with the stars is kind of dumb. also, survivor and amazing race. two shows i couldn't care less about.

band: oh man, considering that i love everything, i think people would be more surprised by what i DO like than what i don't. currently, i have kanye west, lil wayne, taylor swift, miley cyrus, tim mcgraw, britney spears, casting crowns, and joss stone in heavy rotation. BUT maybe a few i don't care to listen to (that is, i'm just uninterested): the beatles, jimi hendrix, david bowie, bob dylan, lou reed. also, anything that you might call "R&B." man, i hate r&b.

that was really cathartic. thanks guys.

on authorial ownership.

i am so angry i could spit.

professor x and i have had some conflicts already, and i find half of what she says patently unreasonable, so i guess i shouldn't have been surprised that she'd find a way on the last day of class to make me so intensely angry. but i was! i actually was. i guess that's my fault.

she made a quick comment, as she was leaving, about the final drafts of our term papers. she said (a semi-paraphrase, as i cannot recall the precise wording), "i'm treating you as professionals, so i expect you to tell me why you don't take my suggestions. i noted that on your second drafts, i was making a lot of the same comments i made on your first drafts. so either take my suggestions or tell me why you aren't, one of the two."

i blinked. said, "um, how would you like us to tell you?" she said, "oh, you can just send me an email." and then she left.

uh. EXCUSE ME?

i own my writing. you own your writing. writing - academic, fannish, scribblings on the back of a napkin, new york times best seller - belongs to the author who penned it. it does not belong to her editors, her friends, her betas, her publishing house, her professors, her peer reviewers. it belongs to her, totally and completely and without exception. that's why we cite when we draw from a source, why we don't plagiarize, why we put an author's name on the cover of a novel.

we don't refrain from plagiarizing or infringing on copyright just because it's bad form and will have people yelling at us. we don't cite the works we used in our writing because we're trying to be nice or because we're trying to take the heat off of ourselves (that is, "don't blame me, she said it first!")

we do those things because to do otherwise is to steal, is to be intellectually fraudulent, is to break the careful agreement drawn between writers and readers. i, the writer, will give you, the reader, my work, but in return, you won't claim it as your own. you can criticize it, burn it, laud it as the best thing ever written, but you can never own it, because i own it. i made it. i thought it up, i put it on paper, i did the work.

it's mine.

in academia, we get the advice of professors to improve our writing. we can choose to take that advice or leave it, knowing that we might get a worse grade if we refuse. but that's our right, because we own our own minds.

we get the advice of peer reviewers, and we can choose to take it or leave it, knowing that a journal might refuse to publish our article. but that's our right, because we own our own minds. it's the same for editors (who might not publish our books or articles), our bosses (who might fire us). there are lots of good reasons to take the advice of people giving it, but there is no way to hold a gun to our heads and say, "you must do what i say."

we get the advice of beta readers because we want to improve, not so that we can give our writing away. we get advice and we think about it and talk about it and we argue about it, but in the end, a beta reader cannot blame an author who does not take her advice. she can believe that the work would have been better had her suggestions been followed, of course. she can tell the author that, straight out. but she cannot, cannot, cannot make the author do anything, because the author owns every word that she creates.

a beta might ask, "why didn't you change such-and-such as i suggested?" the author might reply any number of ways: "i didn't think it was in keeping with the character." "i didn't think it maintained the tone of the story." "i felt that the suggested grammatical changes made this section more difficult to understand."

she could also reply, "because i was partial to the way i wrote it. i liked the way it sounded and felt in my head and in my hands as i wrote it. i put part of myself into that sentence or paragraph and i could not give it up, even to make it easier to read." she needn't apologize. that's a perfectly acceptable answer. if this is ALWAYS the answer, of course, she may need to rethink the way she uses her beta, or why she has a beta, or whether she wants her work to be shown to the world if it is so precious to her.

but in the end, she can always respond, "thank you for your help. i really appreciate hearing what you have to say. but in the end, this is mine and i like it the way it is." because she owns it. because it's hers.

there is often talk about the reader's privilege. i think that's great. i think reader-response theories are fantastic. i think stanley fish's interpretive communities are fascinating. i think hermeneutics are the bee's knees. i stand by the fact that readers have enormous leeway to read a document as they see fit. if an author is unwilling to have this happen, then she should keep her writing locked away. publication and distribution give readers many interpretive rights.

but not ownership.

to ask a student to justify every suggestion not taken (or every author to justify every suggestion from a beta not taken) is to suggest that the professor (or the beta) has ownership of the text. is to suggest that the reader is so privileged that she can choose to obliterate the author's ownership of the text. is to assume that the answer to the question cannot be, "because it's mine and i own it and i don't want to change it."

and that, my friends, is unacceptable.

friday, i'm in... anxiety?

some days i have a fine day, and then suddenly something little will completely destroy it. presentation review by one of my professors that was snide and unhelpful. no particular sentence was particularly rude, but since i know her, i know the tone, and now i want to cry.

cut for angsty whining. feel free to skip. no really.Collapse )